the-clayprofessor

emilyrosebourne:

Hair-Painted Plates, 2014
by Emily Rose Bourne

My work. Thrown porcelain, commercial underglaze, and clear glaze fired to cone 10. The surfacing process was inspired by Stephen Gammell's illustrations and my own experiments in painting and drawing. These are not raku-fired, but are instead results of taking chances and doing some weird shit.  In the words of Ms. Frizzle, “Take chances, make mistakes, get messy.” Do it up.

ceramicsnow

ceramicsnow:

Güliz Korkmaz Tirkeş: Flow Series, 2010-2013

My work in general may be considered as formed under the effect of an outer force. While this force may reveal itself as irregular linear textures on some forms, in others the body itself is bent or squeezed according to the strength and direction of this force. However, the force is not detrimental, but naturally welcomed by the forms.

The flow series also appear as a result of the forces applied by large volumes. The effects of these volumes on these works are embraced with soft and smooth movements and can be traced on the form with a natural flow. As in my other works this also may be seen as traces of an outer force, but these traces are outcomes that are formed within a natural flow and are affirmed by the form. The final form stands upright with its pure, content energy shaped by this feeling of embrace.

ceramicsnow

ceramicsnow:

Lucy Gresley: Vessels, 2014

Vessels is a collection of work that explores the idea of vessels, both as containers and as metaphors for people and their emotions.  My artwork is often about thinking and reflecting – in this case, investigating the different meanings and connotations of vessels. For example, I am interested in the psychoanalytic idea of caregivers as emotional containers, who can hold and re-interpret strong feelings. I am also fascinated by alchemy and particularly the use of vessels in alchemy as sites of transformation.

In making this work, I have become interested in vessels that cannot be used or that will not contain anything. I imagine that vessels can be like people – elegant, funny, self-contained, ineffectual, silly, detached or spilling their contents – and I have played with their form to reflect this. I enjoy mistakes and forms that are intentionally wrong – collapsing spouts and vases without openings. I am also attracted to the anthropomorphic qualities of pots and vases.

I enjoy the freedom of working in clay, which I find a very direct and playful medium. I am also interested in the dialogue between these ceramic pieces and my collage work, which I can use to infer ideas and create narratives.